James Madison

James Madison

James Madison Jr. (March 16 [O.S. March 5], 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States from 1809 to 1817. He is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Madison inherited his plantation Montpelier in Virginia and owned hundreds of slaves during his lifetime. He served as both a member of the Virginia House of Delegates and as a member of the Continental Congress prior to the Constitutional Convention. After the Convention, he became one of the leaders in the movement to ratify the Constitution, both in Virginia and nationally. His collaboration with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay produced The Federalist Papers, among the most important treatises in support of the Constitution. Madison's political views changed throughout his life. During deliberations on the Constitution, he favored a strong national government, but later preferred stronger state governments, before settling between the two extremes later in his life.

In 1789, Madison became a leader in the new House of Representatives, drafting many general laws. He is noted for drafting the first ten amendments to the Constitution, and thus is known also as the "Father of the Bill of Rights." He worked closely with President George Washington to organize the new federal government. Breaking with Hamilton and the Federalist Party in 1791, he and Thomas Jefferson organized the Democratic-Republican Party. In response to the Alien and Sedition Acts, Jefferson and Madison drafted the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, arguing that states can nullify unconstitutional laws.

As Jefferson's Secretary of State (1801–1809), Madison supervised the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the nation's size. Madison succeeded Jefferson as president in 1809, was re-elected in 1812, and presided over renewed prosperity for several years. After the failure of diplomatic protests and a trade embargo against the United Kingdom, he led the U.S. into the War of 1812. The war was an administrative morass, as the United States had neither a strong army nor financial system. As a result, Madison afterward supported a stronger national government and military, as well as the national bank, which he had long opposed. Madison has been ranked in the aggregate by historians as the ninth most successful president.

 Read more...
 
 

James Madison Books and Works List - Best? Worst? Vote!

Votes cast on this list:
Up-Votes: 0
Down-Votes: 0
Views: 3432
 
Best-Votes: 0
Worst-Votes: 0
Total Votes: 0
Books and Works Timeline
 
Download List in Excel/CSV Format
Download List in Mind Map/Freemind Format
Download List in PDF Format
  1. 1
    The Federalist Papers
    0
    0
    0
    0
  2. 2
    Federalist No. 10
    0
    0
    0
    0
  3. 3
    Federalist No. 51
    0
    0
    0
    0
  4. 4
    Federalist No. 39
    0
    0
    0
    0
  5. 5
    Federalist No. 47
    0
    0
    0
    0
  6. 6
    Federalist No. 45
    0
    0
    0
    0
  7. 7
    Federalist No. 48
    0
    0
    0
    0
  8. 8
    Federalist No. 57
    0
    0
    0
    0
  9. 9
    Federalist No. 46
    0
    0
    0
    0
  10. 10
    Federalist No. 62
    0
    0
    0
    0
  11. 11
    Federalist No. 44
    0
    0
    0
    0
  12. 12
    Federalist No. 63
    0
    0
    0
    0
  13. 13
    Federalist No. 42
    0
    0
    0
    0
  14. 14
    Federalist No. 14
    0
    0
    0
    0
  15. 15
    Federalist No. 43
    0
    0
    0
    0
  16. 16
    Federalist No. 37
    0
    0
    0
    0
  17. 17
    Federalist No. 53
    0
    0
    0
    0
  18. 18
    Federalist No. 49
    0
    0
    0
    0
  19. 19
    Federalist No. 58
    0
    0
    0
    0
  20. 20
    Federalist No. 52
    0
    0
    0
    0
  21. 21
    Federalist No. 55
    0
    0
    0
    0
  22. 22
    Federalist No. 54
    0
    0
    0
    0
  23. 23
    Federalist No. 56
    0
    0
    0
    0
  24. 24
    Federalist No. 50
    0
    0
    0
    0
  25. 25
    Federalist No. 41
    0
    0
    0
    0
  26. 26
    Federalist No. 38
    0
    0
    0
    0
  27. 27
    Federalist No. 40
    0
    0
    0
    0
  28. 28
    Federalist No. 18
    0
    0
    0
    0
  29. 29
    Federalist No. 20
    0
    0
    0
    0
  30. 30
    Federalist No. 19
    0
    0
    0
    0
  31. 31
    The forging of American federalism
    0
    0
    0
    0
  32. 32
    Jonathan Bull and Mary Bull
    0
    0
    0
    0
  33. 33
    James Madison: Writings
    0
    0
    0
    0
  34. 34
    The complete Madison
    0
    0
    0
    0
  35. 35
    Letters and other writings of James Madison
    0
    0
    0
    0
  36. 36
    Calendar of the correspondence of James Madison
    0
    0
    0
    0
  37. 37
    The Papers of James Madison Congressional Series, Vol. 12: 2 October 1789 - 20 January 1790
    0
    0
    0
    0
  38. 38
    The Papers of James Madison, Vol. 4
    0
    0
    0
    0
  39. 39
    Religious freedom
    0
    0
    0
    0
  40. 40
    An address delivered before the Agricultural Society of Albemarle, on Tuesday, May 12, 1818
    0
    0
    0
    0
  41. 41
    All impressments unlawful and inadmissible
    0
    0
    0
    0
  42. 42
    Equal religious liberty stated and defended
    0
    0
    0
    0
  43. 43
    An examination of the British doctrine
    0
    0
    0
    0
  44. 44
    President Madison's inaugural speech
    0
    0
    0
    0
  45. 45
    An examination of the British doctrine, which subjects to capture a neutral trade, not open in time of peace
    0
    0
    0
    0
  46. 46
    Extract of a letter from the Secretary of State to Mr. Monroe, relative to impressments
    0
    0
    0
    0
  47. 47
    Letters from the Secretary of State to Messrs. Monroe and Pinkney, on subjects committed to their joint negotiations
    0
    0
    0
    0
  48. 48
    Letters from the Secretary of State to Mr. Monroe, on the subject of impressments, &c
    0
    0
    0
    0
  49. 49
    Mr. Madison's motion for commercial restrictions
    0
    0
    0
    0
  50. 50
    The reply of Mr. Madison, in answer to Mr. Rose, in discussing the affair of the Chesapeake
    0
    0
    0
    0
 
 
comments powered by Disqus
 

Voting Rules

  • You can vote up or down. Please always consider the context when voting, e.g. a song should be voted up or down with respect to the other songs contained on the album, an actor's performance in comparison with other actors in the same movie, a book with respect to other books by the same author or within the same genre.
  • A vote can be cancelled by simply clicking the opposite vote within 24 hours. You can then vote again on the same item.
  • Each user has one vote per item within a specific list every 24 hours. After 24 hours you can vote again on the same item within the same list.
  • You can vote on as many items as you like within a list or on the same item if it's part of another list. For example, you can vote David Bowie up or down on the list of pop music artists as well as on the list of indie rock artists and on the list of rock music artists. etc.
  • Happy Voting!

Related YouTube Videos

#04 James Madison

Excerpt from the History Channel's The Presidents series featuring James Madison.

HISTORY TALKS: James Madison, Father of the Constitution

James Madison did more than any other individual to create the U. S. Constitution and America's "checks and balances" form of government. He also was a ...

Discussion on James Madison

Pulitzer-prize winning historian Jack N. Rakove discusses Madison, his work, and his influence in an interview with Manuscript Division Chief Jim Hutson.